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2020 Patriotic Ornament - 7th Annual Limited Edition

SKU
9-08451

100 Years Celebration

Women's Right To Vote

“The ballot is the key that unlocks the doors to knowledge, to equal rights, to honor, to prosperity.”  — Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

Twenty years after statehood, on February 25, 1909, Acting Governor Hay of Washington State signed House Bill 59 “An act to Amend article VI of the constitution of the State of Washington, relating to the qualifications of voters within the state.” The approval of that bill set the wheels in motion for passage of the 5th Amendment to our State’s Constitution in 1910 allowing women’s suffrage. It would make Washington State the 1st state in the 20th century and the 1st state in almost 15 years, to grant women the right to vote, thus re-invigorating the national effort.

“Failure is Impossible” — Susan B. Anthony

Before the United States would finally submit the 19th Amendment to the states for ratification, there would be 10 long years of activism by the suffragettes including:

  •  Speeches, protests, parades, picketing & arrests
  •  A 2½ year vigil at the White House by the Silent Sentinels
  • Carrie Chapman Catt’s “Winning Plan” which supported women working locally to pressure their states to pass suffrage.

“Men, their rights, and nothing more; Women, their rights, and nothing less.” — Susan B. Anthony

Washington State tried to hold out for the honor of being the last state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, but in the end, State legislator Frances M. Haskell of Pierce County introduced the Federal Suffrage Amendment to the floor and ratification was unanimously approved in both houses making Washington the 35th state to ratify on March 22, 1920. Five months later, Tennessee became the 36th and final state necessary to secure its passage nationwide.

On August 26, 1920 the 19th Amendment was officially adopted ending a generations long quest for the vote and empowering 26 million American women in time for the 1920 Presidential election between Warren G. Harding and James M. Cox.

Stand with the suffragettes and commemorate the VOTE!

The 2020 Patriotic Ornament is Glass Eye Studio's 7th Annual in the series commemorating our nation's heritage. The 2020 design by Piper O'Neill features artisan hand pulled cane and hand-cut sheet glass with a centralized gathered twist expanding and growing into red, white and blue swirls.

Add this American themed ornament to your collection, or can make an appropriate, unique gift to:

  • Commemorate the 100 year anniversary of the 19th Ammendment and honor the important women in your life.
  • Salute our on and off duty military personnel, new recruits, retiring warriors or veterans. 
  • Honor first responders with a valiant nod. 
  • Congratulate a candidate, city official or lawmaker. 
  • Welcome a new citizen. 
  • Thank volunteers for making a make a difference.
  • Share with a Host or Hostess at Fourth of July or Labor Day celebrations. 

This blown glass ornament is a limited edition of 500. Sells out each year! Each one is an individual piece of art, handmade by artisans skillfully working molten glass into keepsakes that will be enjoyed for years to come. All ornaments include the "100 Years Celebration, Women's Right To Vote" insert, a Limited Edition card, and are made with ash from the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. Approximately 3".

Includes (1) gold Keepsake Window Box FREE with every ornament, a $6.00 Value!

$37.50

100 Years Celebration

Women's Right To Vote

“The ballot is the key that unlocks the doors to knowledge, to equal rights, to honor, to prosperity.”  — Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

Twenty years after statehood, on February 25, 1909, Acting Governor Hay of Washington State signed House Bill 59 “An act to Amend article VI of the constitution of the State of Washington, relating to the qualifications of voters within the state.” The approval of that bill set the wheels in motion for passage of the 5th Amendment to our State’s Constitution in 1910 allowing women’s suffrage. It would make Washington State the 1st state in the 20th century and the 1st state in almost 15 years, to grant women the right to vote, thus re-invigorating the national effort.

“Failure is Impossible” — Susan B. Anthony

Before the United States would finally submit the 19th Amendment to the states for ratification, there would be 10 long years of activism by the suffragettes including:

  •  Speeches, protests, parades, picketing & arrests
  •  A 2½ year vigil at the White House by the Silent Sentinels
  • Carrie Chapman Catt’s “Winning Plan” which supported women working locally to pressure their states to pass suffrage.

“Men, their rights, and nothing more; Women, their rights, and nothing less.” — Susan B. Anthony

Washington State tried to hold out for the honor of being the last state to ratify the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, but in the end, State legislator Frances M. Haskell of Pierce County introduced the Federal Suffrage Amendment to the floor and ratification was unanimously approved in both houses making Washington the 35th state to ratify on March 22, 1920. Five months later, Tennessee became the 36th and final state necessary to secure its passage nationwide.

On August 26, 1920 the 19th Amendment was officially adopted ending a generations long quest for the vote and empowering 26 million American women in time for the 1920 Presidential election between Warren G. Harding and James M. Cox.

Stand with the suffragettes and commemorate the VOTE!

The 2020 Patriotic Ornament is Glass Eye Studio's 7th Annual in the series commemorating our nation's heritage. The 2020 design by Piper O'Neill features artisan hand pulled cane and hand-cut sheet glass with a centralized gathered twist expanding and growing into red, white and blue swirls.

Add this American themed ornament to your collection, or can make an appropriate, unique gift to:

  • Commemorate the 100 year anniversary of the 19th Ammendment and honor the important women in your life.
  • Salute our on and off duty military personnel, new recruits, retiring warriors or veterans. 
  • Honor first responders with a valiant nod. 
  • Congratulate a candidate, city official or lawmaker. 
  • Welcome a new citizen. 
  • Thank volunteers for making a make a difference.
  • Share with a Host or Hostess at Fourth of July or Labor Day celebrations. 

This blown glass ornament is a limited edition of 500. Sells out each year! Each one is an individual piece of art, handmade by artisans skillfully working molten glass into keepsakes that will be enjoyed for years to come. All ornaments include the "100 Years Celebration, Women's Right To Vote" insert, a Limited Edition card, and are made with ash from the eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980. Approximately 3".

Includes (1) gold Keepsake Window Box FREE with every ornament, a $6.00 Value!

About The Maker

About Glass Eye Studio

(Seattle, Washington)

Glass Eye Studio was founded in 1978 with the mission to provide young glass artists the opportunity to make a living while they develop their artistic voice. Today, Glass Eye has multiple aspiring artists who work in conjunction with the core team of talented glass blowers who make the company strong.

Everything sold by Glass Eye Studio is made by hand in the Ballard neighborhood of Seattle. Because each item is produced individually, there can be slight differences among pieces, giving each its own artisian character.  Each piece that Glass Eye produces includes fragments from Mt. St. Helens 1980 eruption!

So many prominent glass blowers have spent time at Glass Eye Studio, that local artists like to say "All roads lead to "The Eye".

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